Must Have Prince Bootleg: “Diamonds & Pearls: Beginnings”

Posted by The G on October 26, 2015 under G Reviews | Read the First Comment

Photo, artwork and words by G.

Diamonds and Pearls

Diamonds and Pearls

While the lamestream mainstream media was reporting on Prince reinstating his Instagram account, the real Prince news item of the day went unnoticed: an early incarnation of his 1991 classic album “Diamonds and Pearls” has leaked, and in perfect sound quality! I’ll get to the differences in a little bit, but can we just take a moment to completely lose our minds at how awesome this is! For decades, Prince fans have wondered how these things make their way out of Prince’s legendary vault, and we could speculate for days without a clear answer since reporters never directly ask Prince this million dollar question. One thing you should know if you are just a casual Prince fan: the man has had a 30+ year career and has released over 40 albums under his own name, has written the lyrics and words for another 20 albums for his “proteges,” has toured the world tirelessly throughout his career, sometimes performing as many as 3 shows a day (with completely different set lists) and never stops recording!  At his Minneapolis recording complex, Paisley Park, a library of music known to die-hards as “The Vault” exists, and is rumored to contain thousands of unreleased songs.  THOUSANDS!  The average number of songs an artist releases in a 30 year career usually averages around 300, and this means that Prince is sitting on at least 700 songs that the world will never get to hear.  That’s several 30 year careers worth of music if you don’t want to do the math!  Whoa!  Luckily for die-hards, songs mysteriously escape the vault from time to time, and many of the tracks are as vital as anything he has officially released.  The creativity of this man is something of an anomaly, and that is something that is rarely celebrated in the press, and frankly should be mentioned in every article about him from now until eternity.

“Diamonds and Pearls,” The 13th studio album released by Prince on October 1, 1991 featured the debut of his new band, the New Power Generation.  For the first time, Prince included a backing singer (Rosie Gaines) and a rapper (Tony M.) in the official band lineup.  While Rosie Gaines was a perfect compliment to Prince’s voice, fans and critics did not feel the same way about Tony M.  Prince’s 1980s “golden period” where basically every song he released was amazing, had started to wain, and Prince, for the first time in his career – up to that point – decided to follow a trend rather than set it.  The result was an album that featured some brilliant tracks along side some cringe-worthy rap performances by both Prince and Tony M.  Over the years, the Prince fan community has learned to love all the songs on the record, except “Jughead” which aside from his current output ranks as one of the worst songs he’s ever released.  Meanwhile, in November of 1990, his box office bomb “Graffiti Bridge” had just been released and Prince submitted the first incarnation of one of his final classic albums.  The bootleg “Diamonds and Pearls: Beginnings” features not only a vastly different track list, but every version of every song that eventually got released was dramatically changed.  So this is what you will hear when you track this amazing bootleg down (read: please don’t come asking me for it!)

  1. Something Funky This House Comes.  The officially released album opens with the spiritually charged “Thunder,” but before that song was included, the album was set to open with the rap-heavy “Something Funky This House Comes.”  Tony M. introduces each member of the band and gives them a chance to “do their thing.”  A bold move for Prince to sparsely appear on the opening song, but eventually he changed his mind completely and the track remains unreleased officially to this day.
  2. Daddy Pop.  The song also sits as the second track on the officially released album, but this version is dramatically different.  It features different vocals and the end rap verse by Tony M. is cut out completely in favor of an instrumental break down. The song shows off Prince’s bad-assery (not a word), where he plays the role of “Daddy Pop,” the funkiest man in the land who has “grooves and grooves up on the shelf,” (the first lyric to acknowledge the Vault).  He also basically tell the competition to kiss his ass with the cut lyric, “Oh yeah, I turn the other cheek/ Swing… oops and miss / See this, kiss it!”  Rosie Gaines is utilized greatly for the first time in her brief stint with the NPG as she plays off Prince towards the end, but all of that was cut from the final version. Personally, I think this version is much better than the officially released version.
  3. Walk Don’t Walk. Not that much different than the officially released version, other than it’s a little more stripped down, and perhaps mixed differently.
  4. Schoolyard. This song is Prince as his nastiest.  Taking the view point of a 16 year old kid who is trying to get laid for the first time, it’s perhaps a little more true to life than we all know as around that time, Prince had met his future first wife, Mayte, who was 16 at the time of their meeting.  Not only is the song funky, but the lyrics are the tongue-in-cheek Prince that is very absent from his recent output.  Only Prince could have and get away with a chorus that contains the refrain “Schoolyard / Schoolyard / Gettin’ it on in the Schoolyard.”  The first verse finds Prince fantasizing about his dream girl and when he hangs out with her and his friends, they sit too close in the car and with each turn “Carrie fell in my lap / He asked me where I wanted to / I said “yeah right, like you need a map!”  The second verse finds the botched seduction with Prince getting turned down in favor of his girl getting stoned.  “I said “Carrie, do you wanna dance?” / She said “mmm hmm, yeah, like later man.  First let me smoke this weed.” / “I said “Damn!  My cologne ain’t sayin’ shit if this is what she needs.”  The bridge comes around and Prince finally gets laid.  “Now boys and girls for the graphic part / Close your ears if you ain’t got a nasty heart.”  He continues by slipping a condom on and having premature ejaculation!  “Take a glove and fill it with hot baby lotion and slip it on / Pull it tight / That’s what Carrie was like / 1 stroke and I was done.”  Despite being super funky, the song got shelved and has been circulating in sub-par sound quality among die-hards for 20 years – until now!  He could never release a song like this now, because a Bill Cosby-like investigation of sex with underage girls would surely come up (and maybe it should?  Just sayin’).
  5. Diamonds and Pearls.  One of the big hits off the album, after all these years, it comes a huge surprise to hear a Prince-only version of the song.  The officially released version features Rosie Gaines mirroring Prince’s lyrics and she has her big solo in the middle of the song when she sings “D to the I to the A to the M / O to the N to the D to the Pearls of Love.”  This version features music only during that part and your brain will still hear Rosie when that part comes on.  I’d also like to take this time to give a shout out to the video, where during this part, Prince jumps off a couch and does the splits.  BAD ASS!
  6. Strollin‘.  Again, not much different than the officially released version, but a slightly different mix.  What was great about this song was that Prince showed the world that he could master any style of music from rock to funk and light jazz, in this case, often all in the same album.  Not many people did that then, and certainly not that many people do it now.  That’s yet another reason Prince is so great!
  7. Interlude (Joyful Sound).  This has been circulating as part of an early mix of “Willing and Able” among fans, and it’s basically just a false start and stop to the next track.
  8. Willing and Able.  Prince and the NPG take you to church with this song as Tommy Barbarella’s organ is featured prominently.  The officially released version featured backing vocals by The Steeles, giving the song an extra gospel vibe, but this version features only Prince on vocals.  The Tony M. rap verse at the end of the song is also absent and instead we hear that organ solo I previously mentioned.
  9. Insatiable.  This is the jewel in the crown of this set as this version of the sexy single is dramatically different.  The music is more sparse, to give it a late night jam feeling, and while the vocals on the verses and chorus are the same, the second verse was cut out of the officially released version (despite the lyrics appearing in the CD booklet).  As the song discusses Prince’s insatiable appetite for sex, he also talks about filming his lover for their tryst and as you hear the song, you will submit to any request Prince makes of you!  The ad-libbing at the end of the song is quite different too, and Prince admits that he’s had too much wine, perhaps the only time in his entire catalog he’s admitted that he is wasted.  An interesting historical document even if Prince’s ballads aren’t your thing.
  10. Money Don’t Matter 2Night.  The mix is different, but otherwise the politically charged track is the same.
  11. Horny Pony.  The track was eventually scrapped to make room for the hit song “Gett Off,” and later became the b-side to “Cream,” which was not on the first draft of this album!  A bootleg version that is different than the b-side version has circulated among collectors for many years, and this version is different to that one!  Gotta love Prince!  It is closer to the bootleg version than the b-side version, with different lyrics than the one that got released, but this version is more stripped back and is a lot funkier than both other versions.
  12. Live 4 Love.  The final track on both this and the officially released version of “Diamonds and Pearls.”  This version is slightly different from the original version that has been in circulation and much different to the officially released version.  The lyrics are much more sleepy sounding, versus the released version that finds Prince asserting the lyrics much more forcefully.  The robotic intro is gone from this version and once again Tony M.’s rap verse is nowhere to be found.  The lyrics are also a lot different in several places and the song is about 1 minute shorter than the track that saw the light of day in 1991.

As you listen to this bootleg, you hear a whole different side to Prince, and again, the things he decided to throw away are often better than the best tracks from artists which we shall not name!  It’s really remarkable.  While the casual fan probably cannot comprehend how prolific this man is, die-hards across the world are simultaneously losing their minds as another puzzle piece of the genius known as Prince is revealed.

 

Will The World Finally Get To Know The “Real” Prince? – The G Commentary

Posted by The G on May 7, 2014 under The G Spot | Be the First to Comment

Photo and words by G.

Prince!

Prince!

A few weeks ago, Prince announced a surprise partnership with his former enemy – Warner Bros. Records.  Prince finally achieved all the things he so famously ruined his career for (by changing his name to an unpronounceable symbol in the mid-1990s) due to his unhappiness with having signed an alleged $100 million deal.  He will have ownership of master recordings going forward and as of press time, “new music” has been announced in addition to a “remastered with unreleased music” 30th Anniversary Edition of the “Purple Rain” soundtrack.   Prince fans far and wide are salivating at the prospect of what will be included in this new package, and before I speculate, let me tell you some things you probably don’t know about one of the most famous faces in rock and roll history.

In a 35+ year career in music, Prince has released over 30 studio albums (plus countless internet-only and one off songs) and has penned the lyrics & music or produced entire albums for dozens of artists and in the meanwhile has toured the world consistently, often playing multiple shows (with different set lists) in the same day.  These statistics alone make him one of the most prolific musicians of all time, but this is merely just the Prince that the mainstream world knows about (and many of these projects were not commercially successful so even a lot of these impressive career statistics are only known amongst his die-hard fans).  For every “Manic Monday,” that the world knows about, there are gems like Jill Jones’ 1987 self-titled debut, which only lives amongst die hard fans as a cult classic due to the record being criminally out of print for almost as long as it has existed.

What people also don’t know about Prince is that it’s rumored that he has recorded a song a day for the majority of his career which would equate to approximately 13,000 recorded songs in total (thinking this started when his first album was released in 1978).   13,000 songs!   Having every song the Beatles ever recorded on my iPod, I have 500 songs by them in my library.  The music of the 30 year plus career of Madonna’s music numbers around 325 songs and Pet Shop Boys (who’ve actually released almost twice as many B-sides as Prince has) have around 660 songs in my music library.  None of these numbers come close to 13,000 recorded songs.  (Note: I only have slightly over 2,000 songs by Prince on my iPod – this is not including live recordings). You can see that even with what I have, that doesn’t even scratch the surface of the number of recordings Prince has allegedly made.  He has literally careers of unreleased music and he’s still making new stuff!  It’s mind-blowing!

So what’s the story on these unreleased recordings?  Even if the number 13,000 is exaggerated, there are definitely thousands (which again is many times over the total number of songs your favorite prolific musician has recorded) that exist in the hands of die-hard fans and ex-associates.  How have the songs leaked out?  That’s been subject to rumour for decades, but some of the most popular theories include:

– Prince didn’t pay the studio technicians properly and in retaliation, they made copies of what was recorded and sold them to bootleggers.

– Prince made copies of the tapes for ex-associates of what they were working on and those tapes were either lost, stolen or passed around with the proviso that “you can’t share these with anyone!”

– Prince leaked the songs himself knowing that he is too prolific for record labels to keep up with his creativity.

Whatever the case may be, every time you think you “know” Prince, an unreleased song surfaces and you suddenly see a completely new side to our beloved Gemini.  He has songs that he wrote for females, (singing lines like “I even bought a new dress but when I put it on, I could still feel your touch” with great conviction), epic and utterly bizarre tracks such as “Crystal Ball” that is 10 minutes of  meandering funk (that has since been released officially, years after the fact, though in edited form), unreleased jazz and fusion jams such as a side project called The Flesh (where – as of press time – only one song is available in wide circulation – the jam “U Gotta Shake Something” which is over 14 minutes in length and bares no resemblance to the later released song “Shake” which he gave to The Time), tracks like “Witness 4 The Prosecution” that fuse funk and rock so seamlessly that the song could be recorded by James Brown or The Rolling Stones and have been a hit and rehearsal recordings of things such as an hour long track called “Soul Psychodelicide” (and no less than 5 completely different studio recordings exist in the hands of die-hards).  I could go on for days listing out some of the unreleased fan favorites because for every great song Prince has released, there are probably 10 great ones that never saw the light of day.

Prince, who notoriously does not like to look back (despite playing ‘greatest hits’ shows for the greater part of the last decade after swearing he was not going to play the hits anymore in several “final” tours) has revisited a handful of unreleased tracks over the years, most recently stripping the funk and soul out of beloved tracks to reflect his religious beliefs (Prince is a Jehovah’s Witness now) on songs such as “In a Large Room With No Light” and “Extra Lovable,” changing ‘dirty’ and ‘in your face’ lyrics like “….not as hard as what’s behind door… door number pants” to “ooh, I like it”  making fans wonder why he would commit such a sin.  But that comes with being a Prince fan.

For all the great music he’s given us over the years, it comes with a price – failed ‘membership only’ fan clubs that fail to come through on the promises they make, the announcement of last minute shows where anything can (and does) happen, making fans have to drop everything to make it to his concerts.  You could see him perform 5 nights in a row and each time see a completely different set list where he pulls songs he’s never played live before into the set list and/or scorching guitar solos where he takes you with him to another planet and you’ll be reliving the moment either in your mind (or on bootleg, should one surface) as one of the best nights of your existence for the rest of your life.  He announces projects that get fans salivating and they never get released (remember ‘Crystal Ball 2’ anyone?) and there’s the other douchey stuff like suing fans, shutting down fan sites, sending cease and desist letters to artists that are paying loving tribute to him in their works and going after YouTube for the removal of all content that he is featured in (does he not realize that like it or not, the way new fans discover music is via the internet?!).

His music was so influential to my life from literally the age of 4, when I felt “different” but couldn’t figure out what to do and Prince’s lyrics (and look) were completely unapologetic and always championed being unique at all costs, which helped my life (and obviously the lives of so many people worldwide) and then Prince’s current religious beliefs found him going against all that he used to stand for.  It makes me sick to see someone once so progressive and open minded literally become closed off and preachy about his beliefs.  I’m all for finding yourself and being happy about it, but just don’t shove it down my throat if I choose to believe differently.  For some of the public complaining I’ve done, if you didn’t know me, you’d think I was a hater.  On the contrary, I am a concerned fan who does not enjoy watching someone regress and you do not need to be a rocket scientist to see that this is the case.

Back to the music…

So when the vaults are finally opened, what is going to happen?  Though lots of sexual innuendo is implied in the lyrics of some of the Purple Rain songs (most famously, the lyric from “Darling Nikki” about meeting a girl “in a hotel lobby masturbating with a magazine”), there are no “curse words” per se, so will these recordings stay in tact as they were or will he try and rewrite his history with lyrics that reflect who he is today?  I picked out the songs on a greatest hits compilation called “Ultimate Prince” and after he forced the label to remove the 12″ version of “Erotic City,” every review of the album says “it could have been a great collection if only “Erotic City” were included).  Will he finally embrace his past when he looks back on this era and realizes that when he was 26 years old (in 1984 when Purple Rain was released) that his creativity knew no limits and he was literally changing the world? He’d just filmed his first feature film, had recorded an album with no bad moments on it (and a handful of equally killer b-sides), wrote, recorded and produced albums for The Time and Apollonia 6, was touring (and changing the set list nightly) and recorded countless songs that didn’t even make the cut because there is only so much music the world can handle in the span of a year.

The world can still not handle that much music (and if anything, the iPod generation has made our musical attention spans even shorter), so what will be included on the re-release?  Is he going to fill it with songs by Apollonia 6 and The Time that were in the movie, but never acknowledged on the soundtrack?  Live tracks such as the song “Electric Intercourse” which was taken out of the film in favor of “The Beautiful Ones”?  Speaking of “The Beautiful Ones,” in fan circulation, there is a version that has an extra verse and there is also a 14 minute version of “Computer Blue” which shreds the officially released version (and is 10 minutes shorter).  An extra verse of the song “Purple Rain” was also cut as were songs such as “Traffic Jam,” “Wonderful Ass,” “Possessed,” “Father’s Song” and the list goes on and on.  No less than 25 songs that never saw the light of day are known to exist from the era (and surely there are plenty more that nobody has ever heard) and even if those songs were rescued from the vault, that would more than fill all of the allotted room dedicated to extra material.

This is not even including B-sides (like “Erotic City” and “17 Days”), the 12″ versions (like the 10+ minute version of “I Would Die 4 U”),  the potential for a live concert release from the era, which again found Prince at 26 years old, out-performing legends who’d been around for decades longer.  Also never released was the legendary August 3, 1983 First Avenue concert, which found Prince debuting the classic lineup of The Revolution with Wendy Melvoin on guitar and vocals as well as the first live performance of “Let’s Go Crazy,” “Computer Blue,” “I Would Die 4 U” “Purple Rain,” and was the only time “Electric Intercourse” was ever played in front of an audience.  The Purple Rain score, for which Prince received an Academy Award was also never officially released, so there’s a chance that could finally come out in part or in full as well.

We live in a digital world now, so what that could mean for us is that the casual fans could buy a 2-disc physical set and be super content and for those who want to dig a little deeper, digital only releases of some of the above mentioned tracks and projects could make their way into the hands of the people that so desperately want it.  What’s the point of letting it rot away in a vault, never to be appreciated while the creator of it is alive?  Seems kind of silly.  It’s crazy to think of the possibilities that have kept fans like me, who are not into the current direction Prince has taken musically (or religiously), hanging around in hopes that one day, the person I know that still exists inside of him will finally come outside and play with us again.

I don’t care if he swears anymore or humps the stage like he used to, I just want him to return to acknowledging the reason we all fell in love with him in the first place – because he gave us an alternative to being “ordinary.”  He gave us a reason to celebrate our differences and most of all, he told us “it was ok to do our own thing and if the world didn’t like it, that’s THEIR PROBLEM, NOT OURS!”  He basically helped form my strong work ethic and he made me seek out people that try and set the trend rather than follow them and for all of those things (and I have told him so in person), THANK YOU, PRINCE!!!!!  If nothing, I hope the world who can barely see past “1999” and this album, come to realize, appreciate and celebrate, while he is still alive, that Prince was and is one of the most prolific musicians to ever walk among us and we should cherish it while we still can.

Prince, this is your big chance to convince the non-believers and to reward those of us who have stuck by your side through name changes and religious epiphanies.  You’ve always been at the forefront of setting the trend, forcing everyone to follow in your footsteps, so you are being presented with a golden opportunity that could change the way other artists release their own vault material.   PLEASE DON’T FUCK THIS UP!

I would be more than happy to assist, Prince.  Give me a call!

 

1977 Prince Photos by Robert Whitman at Mr Musichead in Hollywood

Posted by The G on February 27, 2014 under Artsy Fartsy | Read the First Comment

Photos of Robert Whitman’s photos by G.

Prince by Robert Whitman

Prince by Robert Whitman

Los Angeles!  If you are a fan of Prince, you must head over to Mr Musichead in Hollywood to check out a photo exhibit of the singer (circa 1977) by Robert Whitman.  A year before Prince’s debut album “For You” was released, photographer Robert Whitman conducted a series of photo shoots with the soon to be iconic singer in Minnesota for inclusion in Prince’s press kit as he searched for a record deal.  Only 15 press kits were ever assembled and they are one of the most sought after items amongst fans.

Partial gallery view

Partial gallery view

The photographs in this collection are stunning as it’s nearly unfathomable to imagine a time where Prince was merely a 19 year old unknown singer with some songs and a dream.

Close-up of a proof sheet of Prince by Robert Whitman

Close-up of a proof sheet of Prince by Robert Whitman

Prince by Robert Whitman

Prince by Robert Whitman

Many of the photos from these shoots have never been seen before, so you will not want to miss your chance to see these iconic photographs in person.

Prince by Robert Whitman

Prince by Robert Whitman

Mr Musichead is located at 7511 West Sunset Blvd.

Prince by Robert Whitman

Prince by Robert Whitman

Prince by Robert Whitman will be on display through March 7, 2014.

Video: “Yellow Gold” Live and Acoustic by Andy Allo

Posted by The G on January 28, 2014 under Encounters with G, G Reviews, G Videos | Be the First to Comment

HD Video by G.

On January 27, 2014, Cameroonian-born singer-songwriter, guitarist, pianist, model, and actress Andy Allo performed her first ever solo show in New York at Mercury Lounge in the Lower East Side.  Fans braved the freezing temperatures only to have our hearts melted by Andy Allo’s smooth and very beautiful voice.  She performed songs from her debut album “Unfresh,” a cover of Bob Marley’s “Waiting in Vain,” as well as tracks from her latest offering, “Superconductor,” a record that featured some help from the Voldemort of funk – Prince.  Typically when Prince produces an artist, he brings out their best, but I can honestly say after seeing Andy Allo live, she is WAY better off without a little help from her friends.  Her voice is incredible and her songs work better stripped down acoustically than they do featuring purple production.  Like the Harry Potter universe did with Voldemort, Allo did not need to speak his name throughout her show and as a result, we were all able to fall in love with Andy Allo for her gift of song and not for her famous friends.

Check out an acoustic performance of her standout track “Yellow Gold” by clicking PLAY.

There’s no word if the Purple Police will come after me for posting this video, but if they do, I will comply and then write an article which will hopefully go viral about what a horrible person and business man Prince is… and boy, do I have stories I could tell.  Not a threat, just a fact.  He may be a control freak over his intellectual property, but he’s got nothing over mine.  He may dress like a Jehovah’s Witness, but the similarities end there, I assure you!   🙂

Thanks for a great night Andy!

Andy Allo and Geoffrey Dicker

Andy Allo and Geoffrey Dicker

Andy Allo Setlist at Mercury Lounge.  Now property of the G Archives.

Andy Allo Setlist at Mercury Lounge. Now property of the G Archives.

 

Prince Teases NYC Shows Through New Webcast Channel

Posted by The G on June 28, 2013 under GNN | Be the First to Comment

Photo and article courtesy of “No-Named Reporter.”  Introduction by G.

Photo from 3rdEyeGirl Webcast on Jun 21, 2013 9 36 55 PM

Photo from 3rdEyeGirl Webcast on Jun 21, 2013 9 36 55 PM

It’s frustrating being a Prince fan these days.  He sues his die-hard fans; he’s trying to erase his existence from the internet by sending cease and desist orders to anyone who posts videos of him online; his music, which once was a powerhouse has now become a watered down version of himself trying (not very successfully) to sound like “the old Prince” and now just to toy with his fans a little more, he’s back to announcing last minute gigs (that typically cost in excess of $200 a ticket) and has introduced a brand new annoying tactic:  one-off webcasts that can only be seen if you just happen to be in front of a computer in the middle of the night.  For someone trying to gain new fans or cement a dwindling fan base, this hardly seems like the right way to go about it.  Let’s face it – we used to live in the “new power generation” but now we live in the “2 second attention span generation” and when someone who wasn’t born when many of Prince’s classic moments happened, how are they going to discover them (and tell the masses) when they are not available to be seen?!  Of course, seeing a video on Youtube on demand is hardly as satisfying as waiting for MTV or the radio to play the song (just as mp3s and streaming audio are sub-par to vinyl), but to quote Prince himself, this is a “Sign O’ The Times.”  At the very least, he should realize that all of his greatest hits no longer belong to him, but they are now classic songs of the world that will stand the test of time – that is, if they are allowed to be heard.  One thing that will not change with technological advances is that when you discover something great, you want MORE!

I won’t lie and try and make out like I haven’t been a vocal critic of many of the above actions.  My criticism comes from hundreds of in person Prince experiences and not of merely jumping on a hate bandwagon.  I’ve been a die-hard Prince fan since the 1981 album “Controversy” was released and I’ve been there for career highs and career lows.  I’ve heard way too many unflattering stories from many of his former associates and I’ve even gotten into a debate over religion with the man himself at Paisley Park.  He was unwilling to listen to my opinions on religion and philosophy, which I find extremely disappointing as I have a bookshelf filled with texts that I have read and practiced, so in this case,  I know what I am talking about.  (Side note: if you want to talk about this or any of these topics Prince, I am here for you!)  It seems to be a symptom of the Jehovah’s Witness-era of Prince – he claims to be surrounding himself with younger people to obtain fresh ideas, but is he just telling these people what to do knowing they have no business contradicting a living legend?   I have been left with no choice but to separate the man from the music and an attempt to try and remember the “good times” through his fans, which brings me to what you are about to read.

One of his fans (possibly on the inside of the ‘Purple Circle’) is feeling the frustration instead of feeling the funk and wanted to get this message out.  I did not write it, but I found it amusing because I’ve lived these types of scenarios so many times and have been harshly criticized for voicing my opinions.  If you are also a die-hard, you probably have some of the same battle scars as I do. What you choose to do with this article is up 2 U (as they say).  Full disclosure – since I am fortunate enough to see hundreds of live shows by emerging bands each year, frankly, I have had enough with this type of behavior because the reward is not what it once was to me.  Maybe, just maybe, these words will reach the man and he will make a return the excellence he is more than capable of making.  We’ve spent decades listening to him.  Maybe now, he will listen to us!  This an xtended jam, so light some incense and candles and read on…  after the jump.

Love, G xx

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