10 Observations From the Kraftwerk Concert

Posted by The G on April 3, 2014 under Encounters with G, G Reviews | Read the First Comment

Photos by G.

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

To say the Kraftwerk show (their second of 2 sold out nights) at the United Palace Theater in New York on April 2, 2014 was mind-blowing is taking the easy way out.  The show took all of your senses on a journey for 2 solid hours and frankly, I don’t know if I’ll ever be the same again.  Here are 10 things I observed at the Kraftwerk show.  As you look through these pictures, please note that the show was in 3-D, which pushed the boundaries out a little further on the definition of the word “epic.”

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

1. Mind-blowing visuals were not saved for the finale.  The show got better and better with each new song.  With a 20 song set list, my brain was so over-stimulated,  I could barely even function once the show was over!   Of course, I pulled it together eventually ;)

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

2. The United Palace Theater is absolutely stunning.  It’s very ornate (more so than the Beacon Theatre), and though it’s located on 179th Street, the trek was completely worth it. Security would not let you find your own seat.  They insisted they help you to your seat which caused a traffic jam of epic (and extremely annoying) proportions.

Kraftwerk

Ralf Hutter of Kraftwerk

3. Ralf Hutter is the only original member of Kraftwerk that is still in the band.

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

4.  Despite being one of the most visually stunning shows I’ve ever seen, SO MANY PEOPLE felt compelled to keep getting up during the show and walked back and forth thus obstructing the views of so many people who actually attended the show to WATCH IT!  I swear, what is wrong with people?!  Either they text too much, talk too much, or in this case walk around too much.  What’s the point of going to a show if you aren’t going to be present?

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

5. The lone words Ralf uttered to the crowd were “Auf Wiedersehen.”

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

6. Even though some of their songs are 40 years old, they still sounded fresh and contemporary.  Accept no other robot substitutes (read: Daft Punk)

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

7. Being in a room filled with nearly 4,000 people wearing 3-D glasses was super cool!

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

8. This show definitely goes down as one of the best concerts I’ve ever been to, and I’ve seen thousands of bands.

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

9. Coldplay (on their song “Talk”) basically stole the music for “Computer Love” and 2 Live Crew (on their song “Dick Almighty”) took “The Man-Machine.”  I hope they paid royalties!  Hearing their music makes you realize what pioneers Kraftwerk are and how many musicians owe them a lot for being so forward thinking.

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

10. If Kraftwerk ever comes to your town, DO NOT MISS THE SHOW UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES!

And now, enjoy some more stunning photos from the show!

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

Kraftwerk

Ralf Hutter of Kraftwerk and Geoffrey Dicker

Ralf Hutter of Kraftwerk and Geoffrey Dicker

Great meeting you Ralf, and as I told you in person – thanks again for one of the most amazing shows I’ve ever attended!  You are a god!

Stay tuned for a video of “The Man-Machine” (where you will see what I complained about in Observation #4).

The setlist was:

The Robots / Metropolis / Numbers – Computer World / It’s More Fun To Compute / Home Computer / Computer Love / The Man-Machine / Spacelab / The Model / Neon Lights / Autobahn / Prologue / Tour De France 1983 / Tour De France 2003 (Etape 1) / Tour De France 2003 (Etape 2) / Airwaves / News / Geiger Counter – Radioactivity/ Ohm Sweet Ohm / Trans-Europe Express – Metal On Metal – Abzug / Boing Boom Tschak – Techno Pop – Musique Non Stop

Encore: Aero Dynamic / Planet of Visions

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Chelsea Clinton and Lily Cole Launch “Impossible” App at Apple Store

Posted by The G on March 20, 2014 under G Reviews | Be the First to Comment

Photos by G.

Chelsea Clinton and Lily Cole

Chelsea Clinton and Lily Cole

On March 19, 2014, Chelsea Clinton and model/actress Lily Cole discussed Lily’s new app “Impossible” at the Apple Store in SoHo, New York.  Despite the negative connotation with the title of the app, “Impossible” seeks to help connect people to find others out there with the same interests, connect people to make their impossible dreams come true (sort of like how Craig’s List offers services) and also just gives a space for people to just show their gratitude.

Chelsea Clinton

Chelsea Clinton

The information presented was quite awesome.  It gives you the feeling that there can be an self-moderated online community that seeks positivity instead of whining and bitching about all that is wrong with the world.  It also seems to present an alternative to the time wasting and ever-present negativity that you find on Facebook and Twitter.

Lily Cole

Lily Cole

On a personal note, I’ve fallen for celebrity/politician bullshit many times in the past where you see them speak (either on TV or in real life, for me mostly in real life) and they seem to be such pleasant people, but once the cameras are off and they have the chance to really ‘put their money where their mouth is’ so to speak, you see a different side of them completely.  Lily and Chelsea Clinton spent a good amount of time talking about giving gratitude and being thankful for all their blessings and moments after the talk, Clinton showed her gratitude true colors by having ZERO intention of stopping to talk to the couple of fans that were interested in meeting her.  What happened to all that gratitude she just mentioned?   Hmmmm….. The moral of the story: NEVER TRUST A POLITICIAN.  I’m grateful that I never have and I never will.  Thank you.  Thank you. Thank you.

10 Observances from Arctic Monkeys live at Madison Square Garden

Posted by The G on February 10, 2014 under G Reviews | Read the First Comment

Photos by G.

Alex Turner of Arctic Monkeys

Alex Turner of Arctic Monkeys

If you read any music website these days, they can’t stop stroking it over the band Arctic Monkeys.  During the release of last year’s “AM” album, their fifth record, the band blew up and are now playing arenas.  Despite their growing popularity, prior to seeing them live, I’d only heard two of their songs.  Because I am in a position to meet the people that create the art, I often choose to meet the artist before I take a look at their work because from experience, countless artists of all genres that have severely rocked my world have been super cool and others whose art I could take or leave have turned out to be pricks.  There is too much choice in the world for me to waste my time with people that have little or no respect for the very people that have contributed to their success.  Despite having TWO bad experiences meeting this band, I fully admit that the two songs I know from this band I quite enjoy, so I decided to give them the benefit of the doubt and see them live.

This has happened to me many times before where I am literally sitting in an arena filled with 18,000  people and I have NO IDEA of any of the music I am about to hear.  This method is not for everyone, but I highly recommend it.  You can truly go in with an open mind and let these people do their jobs as rock stars and turn you into a fan before the night is over.  Arctic Monkeys played their largest ever US show on February 8, 2014 at Madison Square Garden in New York.  Here are 10 observations from my experience at the show.

1. The concert was not much of a ‘show.’  Playing Madison Square Garden is a privilege and not a right, so one would have thought this show would have been a spectacle as most concerts at the Garden are, especially since the band has spent 5 albums working up to this moment.  Instead, the Arctic Monkeys had a gigantic but thin “A M” sign behind the band that lit up predictably during most songs.  It was definitely a medium sized show placed in a large venue.

2. Arctic Monkeys do very little to get the crowd engaged.  There was little banter between lead singer Alex Turner and the crowd.  Turner played guitar for most songs and as a result, he stood in one place behind the microphone stand for the majority of the show.  Crowd sing-a-longs were not happening either, which brings me to point number 3…

3. Arctic Monkeys songs are mostly forgettable.  They do have some catchy moments, but would I rather listen to or see a band like Kasabian, Fratellis or Scissor Sisters whose music will not leave your head once it burrows itself inside?  Yeah, any day!  I mention these three bands because to me, Arctic Monkeys are an amalgamation of these 3 bands.  I made myself a playlist of all the songs they performed in concert so I can focus on the studio versions and  like I felt at the show, the music is pleasant and not offensive, but that’s about all I can say for it.  I don’t see myself listening to their music on constant repeat.

4. Their music is very formulaic overall.  Not very exciting verses and large choruses.  So original.  NOT!

5. They focused too much on their new album.  They played all but 2 tracks off their newest record so fans that have been with Arctic Monkeys since the beginning have effectively been forgotten at their largest show to date in America.  What a way to say thanks to your fans.  Based on my not good experiences of meeting them, I am not surprised one bit.

6. The crowd was limp.  As I said earlier, the band did very little to get the crowd engaged but for this bullet point, I’d like to focus on the lack of the crowd getting excited during songs.  Sure there was generous applause in between songs, but it seemed that once a song started, people went back to texting and taking annoying cell phone pictures of either the band or the people they came with instead of getting involved with the show.  I spent a lot of time looking around at the crowd reaction during the songs and for the lack of excitement I saw, I think people would have been better off playing the records at home and saving the expense and hassle of going to an arena.  This is actually an observation that can be noted at most concerts as technology has really hindered people’s ability to live in the moment, but that’s a grievance for another day.

7. Their music, though popular, had little crossover appeal with people over 30.  The crowd was extremely young and I felt like a dinosaur.  For a rock band, I thought the crowd would be a bit more diverse, but I was wrong.

8. Lead singer Alex Turner is cute.  Not the hottest guy I’ve ever seen, but he definitely has a 1950s greaser vibe going on and when I found myself getting bored, I was happy that I had some eye candy.

9. They covered The Beatles as safely as possible.  It was the 50th Anniversary of the Beatles being on the Ed Sullivan Show on the weekend of the Arctic Monkeys concert so they played a little tribute to the Fab Four.  They chose “All My Loving.”   It was a “by the numbers” cover.  No risk involved.  Of course, every music site is juicing all over it like they took a risk and played “Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey” or “Helter Skelter” which would have been much more suited to their style.  But with the new trend in playing covers, I am grateful they didn’t do an ironic cover where they played an acoustic version of a song that has no business being disrespected that way.

10. Final thoughts.  I am more familiar with Arctic Monkeys than I was before I walked into the show.    I can’t say I hated the show, because I did not.  I also can’t say that I will become a die hard after seeing them live.  They have a handful of songs that I can see myself revisiting and they have many more that were completely forgettable to me.  I make it my mission to have fun wherever I go, in spite of my surroundings, and yes, I had fun.  But that says more about me than it says about Arctic Monkeys.  I can’t believe that in the two times I’ve seen this band in “autograph situations” they chose to ignore fans because I see no reason to patronize a mediocre band who have let a tiny bit of fame go to their heads.  There are plenty of other bands who appreciate the position they are in and who are better performers.

The setlist was:

Do I Wanna Know? / Brainstorm / Don’t Sit Down ‘Cause I’ve Moved Your Chair / Snap Out of It / Crying Lightning / Old Yellow Bricks / Fireside/ Knee Socks / Why’d You Only Call Me When You’re High? / Arabella / Dancing Shoes / Pretty Visitors / I Bet You Look Good on the Dancefloor / Cornerstone / I Wanna Be Yours / Fluorescent Adolescent / 505 (with Miles Kane)

Encore:
All My Loving (The Beatles cover) (with Miles Kane) / One For The Road / R U Mine?

Alex Turner of Arctic Monkeys 2

Alex Turner of Arctic Monkeys

 

10 Observations from MGMT at Barclays Center

Posted by The G on December 14, 2013 under G Reviews | 3 Comments to Read

Photos by G.

Andrew Van Wyngarden of MGMT

Andrew Van Wyngarden of MGMT

On December 13, 2013, New York’s own MGMT played Barclays Center in Brooklyn, thus making it MGMT’s biggest NY show to date.  Here are 10 observations from my experience at the show.

1. Every hipster in New York was at the MGMT show.

2. After seeing MGMT in small venues (Mercury Lounge), medium sized venues (Webster Hall), festivals (All Points West), large venues (Radio City Music Hall), and museums (Guggenheim), their best show to date was the arena (Barclays) show where they were able to show off extremely cool visuals and they let the music do the talking.  Though being a “hipster who jumped the shark” type band, their songwriting is really excellent.

3. During their epic 12 minute song “Siberian Breaks,” which features many changes, the audience had no idea it was the same song and applauded thunderously as each change happened.

4. MGMT smartly paced out their 3 major “hits” (‘Time to Pretend,’ ‘Electric Feel’ and ‘Kids’) and after “Kids” was played at least 1/2 of Barclays Center made a mass exodus for the door, despite there being several songs to go.

5. Even though they played 5 songs from their disappointingly horrible new album, they were peppered in between their more “catchy” and “linear” songs off their first two albums, therefore not derailing the momentum of the show too badly.

MGMT

MGMT

6. Although the setlist was 16 songs long, favorites such as “The Handshake,” “Brian Eno,” “Astro-Mancy,” “Destrokk” and “Future Reflections” were omitted.

7. Nearly everyone around where I sat took selfies for the duration of the show.

8. The “cheap seats” section was closed thus messing with the acoustics of the arena and the sound was pretty bad, whereby it was very echo-y and it was very hard to make out the lyrics.

9. A gigantic cowbell was played during “Your Life Is A Lie,” and when Gibby Haynes from Butthole Surfers (who was a special guest that came out to play the dreaded instrument) missed his cues, you could still hear the sound of the cowbell thus potentially arousing a “Cowbell Lipsync” scandal.

10. MGMT at BRCLYS were AWSM and a video of “Congratulations” will be coming soon!

The setlist was:

Flash Delirium / Time To Pretend / Introspection / The Youth / Of Moons, Birds & Monsters / Mystery Disease / It’s Working / Weekend Wars / I Found A Whistle / Siberian Breaks / Electric Feel / Your Life Is A Lie / Kids / Cool Song No. 2 / Alien Days

Encore: Congratulations

“Autobiography” by Morrissey – The G Review

Posted by The G on November 20, 2013 under G Reviews | Read the First Comment

Photo of the book cover by G.

"Autobiography" by Morrissey

“Autobiography” by Morrissey

Morrissey will disapprove of this review.

There are so many levels to “Autobiography” by Morrissey, I don’t even know where to begin.  I guess I could start by saying this is one of the most poetically written books I’ve ever read (volumes of actual poetry included).  Stephen Patrick Morrissey’s 450 page account of his own life sometimes makes you laugh, sometimes makes you want to become a poet and sometimes makes you want to hunt him down and smack the shit out of him.

It’s well over 100 pages before he even starts to talk about his own music career, opting instead to tell you about why Lou Reed and David Bowie are geniuses (no shit, Sherlock!).  He also spends a great deal of those 100 plus pages (a trend that runs throughout the book) complaining about how life has wronged him and how none of it is his fault.  In those rare moments where Morrissey drops a story such as one where he waited at a hotel to meet a band in his adolescence, talking about hanging out with rockers such as Chrissie Hynde, Nancy Sinatra or Bowie, you want to take Morrissey home with you and embrace him forever.  When he (poetically) talks about his old teachers, the venom and bitterness he still feels towards them all these years later makes you just want to shout at your book – GET THE FUCK OVER IT!!!!

You almost never get the story behind the songs or music and instead, you learn of every single bad review, bad interview, bad business deal and bad manager Morrissey has had – and sadly, there are a lot.  When he talks about his former Smiths band member Mike Joyce (drums) suing Morrissey and Johnny Marr for royalties, you feel sympathy at first because in reality, this case should have been thrown out immediately, but instead, the court case drags on and he punishes the reader for over 40 pages whereby you start to think that it is you who are actually on trial.

Despite never achieving Beatles-level success, The Smiths have firmly carved out their place in rock and roll history, yet that doesn’t seem to be good enough for the Moz who only mentions many of his solo or Smiths songs just to let you know that despite being pegged to debut at number one during their week of release, somehow they did not.  He lets the reader know that he is ultra-sensitive and cries a lot, but doesn’t ever seem to realize a basic spiritual principle that we create our own destiny.  He fails to recognize that maybe, just maybe he has caused these bad things to happen in his life.  He rarely shows gratitude and wherever possible, he picks apart even the best of circumstances.  Even towards the end of the book, he talks about the love that audiences shower him with nightly and not only is it not enough but it makes him look away.

If you’ve ever met Morrissey in person, you know in advance that you are almost guaranteed to have a bad experience (in many times of seeing him in the flesh, one of those many was positive for me) and as you read this book, it’s no wonder – he’s quite a miserable curmudgeon who seems impossible to please.  With such a great gift to bestow upon the world, I find it really sad that he chooses to live his life so negatively.  It’s also kind of shocking that after spilling the words out onto these pages, he never once has the epiphany that maybe it is HE who should change.  After a lifetime of unsuccessfully playing and losing at the blame game, perhaps it is finally time Morrissey take responsibility for his own actions.

But for better or for worse this is who Morrissey is and his words, whether sung or written, are essential.

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