Morrison Hotel Gallery Celebrates The 50th Anniversary of The Beatles Arrival in New York

Posted by The G on February 11, 2014 under Artsy Fartsy, Encounters with G | Read the First Comment

Photos of photos by G.

The Beatles

The Beatles

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of The Beatles landing in America, Morrison Hotel Gallery has a special exhibit of Beatles photos on display curated by Julian Lennon.  25 photos are on display in New York and a further 25 are being shown in Los Angeles.

Paul and George

Paul and George

Many of these photos have never been seen before and as you can see in the above photo of Paul McCartney, it is absolutely stunning.

Paul and John by Pattie Boyd

Paul and John by Pattie Boyd

Pattie Boyd, who took the above photo of the Beatles circa “The White Album” was in attendance at the opening night reception.  More on Pattie in a moment.

Paul

Paul

The Morrison Hotel Gallery is located in its new space at 116 Prince Street, Second Floor in Manhattan.

As a bonus photo, the Ed Sullivan Theater, where the David Letterman Show now tapes, commemorated the Beatles 50th anniversary by posting this flashback sign above the theater, which I froze my little buns off to photograph for you, my dear readers 🙂

Ed Sullivan Theater

Ed Sullivan Theater

Now back to Pattie Boyd.  Pattie was married to George Harrison and was with George on the night that George and John Lennon took LSD for the first time, which is arguably one of the most important events in music history as the night totally changed the Beatles sound into something much more experimental which of course has influenced every band to come out since.  She is the inspiration behind tracks such as “Something” and “For You Blue” and as she was later married to Eric Clapton, she is also the inspiration for “Layla.”  WOW!  She attended the opening night reception and was extremely nice.  See what the gorgeous (and still gorgeous) Pattie Boyd looks like after the jump.

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Photos: “Good Ol’ Freda” Discussion at Apple Store

Posted by The G on September 6, 2013 under Encounters with G, G Reviews | Be the First to Comment

Photos by G.

Freda Kelly and Ryan White

Freda Kelly and Ryan White

On September 5, 2013 at the Apple Store (the computer manufacturer, not the Beatles company) in New York, Freda Kelly and director Ryan White discussed their documentary film “Good Ol’ Freda.”  Freda Kelly had one of the best jobs ever imaginable – working as The Beatles’ secretary from the Pete Best days to a year after their breakup.  She was in charge of everything from answering fan mail to guarding all the secrets of the Fab Four.  The film seems to be less of a rehash of what we already know and instead, a document of The Beatles from the perspective of a “Fifth Beatle,” if you will.  You will fall in love with Freda Kelly as she is grateful for her privileged position and between her stories and previously unseen photos with The Beatles, there is definitely new material for those who think they’ve seen and heard it all.

Good Ol' Freda

Good Ol’ Freda

Director Ryan White talked about getting the coveted Beatles tracks included in the film, which required numerous approvals from Beatle members, widows, lawyers and ultimately because Freda was so loyal in her tenure with the group, rights to use the songs were granted.  “Good Ol’ Freda” is being released in selected theaters this weekend and will also be available on iTunes imminently.

Freda Kelly and Geoffrey Dicker

Freda Kelly and Geoffrey Dicker

I met Freda at the discussion and she was very lovely.  Lovely Freda.  Get it!  Ha!  Seriously, I fell in love with her listening to her speak, so if you are a Beatles fan, “Good Ol’ Freda” is a must see!  Thanks again Freda!

Review: “Rock Chick: A Girl and Her Music” by Patricia Kennealy-Morrison

Posted by The G on September 4, 2013 under G Reviews | Be the First to Comment

Photo of the book cover by G.

Rock Chick: A Girl and Her Music - The Jazz & Pop Writings 1968 - 1971 by Patricia Kennealy-Morrison

Rock Chick: A Girl and Her Music – The Jazz & Pop Writings 1968 – 1971 by Patricia Kennealy-Morrison

It’s funny to be writing a review of an anthology of musings on now legendary albums on the same day I read a review of a Nine Inch Nails concert where the writer (from the Associated Press, no less) said the highlight of the evening was the show stopping encore – “a cover of Johnny Cash’s ‘Hurt.'”  The review didn’t bother to research that the song was in fact a Nine Inch Nails song!  For now, let’s forgive that horrible oversight and jump in the time machine.  Let’s go back, way back, to the late 1960s when new music sounded like nothing you’d ever heard before and each week saw the release of a mind-blowing album.  Enter Patricia Kennealy-Morrison.  Her book “Rock Chick: A Girl and Her Music – The Jazz & Pop Writings 1968 – 1971” is a collection of her reviews from the golden age of rock and roll.  For those of us that weren’t around in this heyday, Patricia sets the stage by describing the times.  From free records and free love to gaining back stage access and overcoming rampant sexism in the industry, Patricia was lucky enough to have some incredible stories and even better – she got paid to write about them!

In music today, when talking about artists, the first words that come to mind are “sounds like [insert classic band name here].”  In the late 1960s, you had to be a lot smarter because the music that was being released often sounded like nothing you’d ever heard before (or since!).  Keeping these thoughts in mind, reading her reviews of records such as “Cheap Thrills” by Big Brother and the Holding Company are even more essential as she dissects the nuances of how the songs sound on the album versus how they were performed in concert, an experience many of us would kill to have had.  In the end, she recommends the album by telling the reader, “it’s wild, it’s exciting, it’s exuberant as hell, and it loves you.”

As if it weren’t enough to try and explain Janis Joplin to people that may not have been familiar with her music at the time, Patricia Kennealy-Morrison also had the formidable task of reviewing “The White Album,” “Abbey Road” and “Let It Be” by The Beatles.  Having lived in a world where those albums always existed, I found myself setting “Rock Chick” down many times to just close my eyes and imagine a time where these legendary recordings were being heard for the first time.  By today’s standards, you could not say that every cut on each album is anything but essential (except “Octopus’ Garden,” which has not gotten better with age), but at the time, she explains her honest feelings on “The White Album” – “the first time I heard it, I thought it was spectacular, then I thought it was dismal.  Now I think I won’t think about it, but just dig it, because more than anything it is a happy album.”  She rightly compares the tensions of the songs on “Let It Be,” to the sound of creaky floor boards about to cave in from the pressure and further goes on to state that the album might as well be called “Rest In Peace.”

Rock Chick” isn’t all about album reviews, however.  Patricia wrote about her experiences at Woodstock, going to music events with the art elite (read: art snobs) at the Whitney Museum (some things never change!), critical analysis of the changing times (foreshadowing the dismal state of music today) both for women and the music industry, rants about the rising cost of ticket prices (to $10 at the time – oh, to be so lucky now!) and interviewing future legends such as Jeff Beck.  Her reviews are peppered with after thoughts, written specifically for the book, that put into context what was happening at the time, both in her personal life as well as the politics of the magazine, which brings us to perhaps the most important reviews she wrote – those of The Doors.  If you are unfamiliar with Patricia Kennealy-Morrison, you are about to find out where the Morrison in her name originates.

Getting to interview The Doors on a trip to New York as they were recording their most left of center record (and perhaps my favorite), “The Soft Parade,” Jim Morrison and Patricia Kennealy really hit it off, to put it mildly.  This is where “Rock Chick” and Kennealy-Morrison’s autobiography “Strange Days – My Life With and Without Jim Morrison” fits in perfectly as a companion book. “Strange Days” elaborates on the romance and ultimate wedding of Jim and Patricia and we get to be flies on the wall for some of the most epic stories in rock and roll.  Despite their relationship, Patricia Kennealy-Morrison had no problem calling The Doors out on a weak track and refused to write a glossy review of Jim Morrison’s first poetry books “The Lords and The New Creatures,” to placate her lover.  She goes on to explain that Jim appreciated her honesty and in fact felt that her review was constructive criticism and as Patricia points out, a marriage proposal followed several days after the publication of the article, so clearly the artist valued her journalistic integrity.  “Rock Chick” also features her reviews of “Morrison Hotel,” “The Soft Parade,” “13” and “Absolutely Live.”  Kennealy-Morrison had left Jazz & Pop prior to the release of “LA Woman,” so no review is included, but again some of the behind the scenes stories of “LA Woman” are featured in “Strange Days.”

The times changed and Patricia Kennealy-Morrison moved on from Jazz & Pop to become a copywriter for RCA Records, getting to work with and write ad campaigns for David Bowie, The Kinks and Lou Reed, just to name a few artists.  Ultimately, Patricia Kennealy-Morrison would go on to write 14 other books (with more on the way):  the science-fantasy series “The Keltiad” as well as “The Rock and Roll Murders: The Rennie Stride Mysteries,” of which she drew inspiration from her real life experiences in ‘the biz,’ as well as her autobiography “Strange Days – My Life With and Without Jim Morrison.”

Flash forward to present day.  We live in a world where music is instantly forgettable and reviews are often more tedious and pretentious than the music itself.  Books like “Rock Chick: A Girl and Her Music – The Jazz & Pop Writings 1968 – 1971” by Patricia Kennealy-Morrison are living proof that it was not always that way – far from it, actually.

“Rock Chick” is available on Amazon.com.  GET IT!

An Encounter with Ringo Starr

Posted by The G on June 25, 2012 under Encounters with G | 2 Comments to Read

Photo by G.

Ringo Starr and Geoffrey Dicker

Ringo Starr and Geoffrey Dicker

O M G!  Before I go any further, my deepest gratitude to Anne Raso and Gail Worley for getting me into such a marvelous event.  Ringo Starr was in New York to celebrate an exhibit of his art. As you can imagine, the gallery was packed to the rafters with art aficionados, Beatles fans and press all trying to get a piece of a living legend.  As Ringo was making his way out of the gallery, I made my move and asked for a photo.  Because he was utterly mobbed, he said “if you can take it as I walk, it’s ok.”  As I was trying to get my shot, a ton of people crowded in and it became quite a mess.  I ended up getting pushed into other people and I nearly tripped over someone.  Ringo saw the transaction and said “that’s not peace love and understanding” and kept walking. Though it was not entirely my fault, I apologized to Ringo Starr because the last thing I’d ever want to do is make a Beatle upset.  It was not looking likely that he was going to stop now and I was certain that my opportunity was nearly blown.  What happened next was sort of dumb luck, but it ended up working out perfectly! One of the security guards with Ringo literally grabbed my shirt and was trying to push me out of the way.  It was unnecessary and excessive force and I yelled out “Hey!  That is not peace love and understanding either!”  Ringo saw what happened and he stopped and let me get my photo!  WOW!  What a class act!  Ringo – thanks for being so cool and of course for being in the best band of all time!  This is a night I will never forget!

I Feel Blue by Ringo Starr

I Feel Blue by Ringo Starr

 

 

Beatles Bandits

Posted by The G on December 8, 2011 under Street Art | Read the First Comment

Photo by G.

Beatles Bandits by MBW
Beatles Bandits

In loving memory of John Lennon (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980).

 

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